fbpx

The 11 Best Wide Angle Lenses for Landscape Photography

Last Updated:

If you’re anything like me, nothing excites you more than preparing to shoot landscape photos. You have found the perfect location, came at the right time of day, and have your camera bag packed, but there’s one problem. Your lens just isn’t wide enough to capture the full beauty of the scene. So you settle for shooting a more zoomed-in angle and focus on what you can capture while thinking “dang, I really need to add a wide angle lens to my kit.”

That exact situation is what inspired me to buy my first wide-angle lens when I started shooting landscape photos. Now more than ten years later, I’ve tried or owned a handful of wide-angle lenses and can’t imagine my life without one. So whether you’re looking for your first wide-angle lens or an upgraded lens for your landscape photography, I compiled this list of your best options based on personal experience and research.

Everything in this list has been rated based on overall image quality, sharpness, distortion, cost, and overall value for your money. As not all wallets are the same, a diverse range of lenses are included to cater to photographers on varying budgets, even if you’re totally new to photography. Let’s get started!

ImageProductFeaturesPrice
Best Overall
Canon EF 16-35mm F/4L IS USM

Canon EF 16-35mm F/4L IS USM

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon EF
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Best For Nikon
Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm F/2.8G ED

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm F/2.8G ED

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Nikon F
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.27m / 0.9ft
Find On Amazon
Best For Sony
Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 GM

Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 GM

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Sony E
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art

Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Various (Sony, Leica, Canon, Nikon)
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.26m / 0.85ft
Find On Amazon
Best For Canon
Canon RF 15-35mm F/2.8L IS USM

Canon RF 15-35mm F/2.8L IS USM

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon RF
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F/4 S

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F/4 S

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Nikon Z
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Best Budget Option
Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD

Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Various (Canon EF-S, Nikon F, Sony A, Pentax K, etc.)
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.24m / 0.79ft
Find On Amazon
Best Third Party Choice
Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon EF or Nikon F
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F/4 R OIS WR

Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F/4 R OIS WR

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Fujifilm X
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.24m / 0.79ft
Find On Amazon
Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH

Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Micro Four Thirds
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.25m / 0.82ft
Find On Amazon
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm F/2.8 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm F/2.8 PRO

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Micro Four Thirds
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.2m / 0.66ft
Find On Amazon
We review products based on independent experience and research, but we may earn affiliate commissions from buying links on this page.

The Best Wide Angle Lens for Landscape Photography

1. Canon EF 16-35mm F/4L IS USM

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon EF
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft

Canon’s “L” for Luxury line of lenses has long held a superb reputation in the photo industry – and rightfully so. Known for its high-quality glass, durable build, and strong brand name behind it – the Canon EF 16-35mm F/4L IS USM is no exception to the classic L characteristics. 

For starters, the 16-35mm focal length is a frequent choice by landscape photographers, with the zoom offering a lot of versatility in composition. 16mm at its widest captures the vastness of a location, while the tighter 35mm can prove efficient for more focused shots, such as that of a specific mountain range. Despite wide angle lenses naturally having some distortion due to the curvature in the glass, this lens is relatively minimal in distortion. 

sun flare photography
Taken handheld at 16mm on the Canon 16-35mm F/4 lens

Keeping true to Canon’s promise of workhorse lenses, this model sports thick rubber gaskets for weather sealing, preventing the sensitive inner components from suffering at the hands of rain, snow, mud, sand, and dirt. The rugged build material can also withstand a drop or two – something inevitable for anyone traveling the great outdoors. 

The lens is also packed with valuable features and improvements against competitors in the same focal length, such as image stabilization (which allows a few stops leniency in shutter speed) and lens coatings that prevent chromatic aberration, flaring, and other quality discrepancies. The edge-to-edge sharpness is also worth mentioning, as your landscape will be just as sharp in the corners as it will be in the center.

The above being said, this lens is not as fast as some others in the 16-35mm range, being an F/4 rather than an F/2.8. Most landscapes are shot at much narrower apertures anyways; however, the loss in aperture may be impactful for nighttime landscapes. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Versatile focal length range for different types of landscapes
  • High-quality L series construction and weather sealing
  • Image stabilization system for handheld shooting
  • Excellent image quality

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Expensive compared to other wide-angle zoom lenses
  • Not the best in low light with an F/4 aperture

2. Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm F/2.8G ED

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Nikon F
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.27m / 0.9ft

Regarded as one of Nikon’s most famous lenses, the Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm F/2.8G ED is a beloved choice in the landscape, real estate, and architecture photo niches. The vast field of view provides countless opportunities to capture massive scenes, with enough width to include the foreground as well. 

With a consistent F/2.8 aperture, dimmer shooting opportunities are much more achievable than lenses built at a narrower aperture. Even though many landscapes are captured at a F/stop of 9 and higher, widening to an F/2.8 opens up many more opportunities. This lens is also rather sharp throughout its aperture range; you’ll find the same clarity at F/2.8 as you would at F/11.

The “legendary” status for this lens is due to this model being one of the highest quality wide angle lenses ever made by Nikon. This lens delivers superb image quality with exceptional sharpness, contrast, and color accuracy across the frame while also sporting minimal chromatic aberration, edge vignetting, and flare control. 

For a lens this wide, the distortion is also relatively minor, considering competing models have a strong fisheye effect at 14mm. Any distortion can be easily fixed with the proper lens profile in Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop. 

Unfortunately, landscape photographers that enjoy using filters (such as neutral density filters or polarizers) will be well out of luck with this lens. The glass is so bulbous that filters aren’t able to be used. While there are ways to get around using filters, this can be a deal breaker for some photographers.  

Reasons To Buy:

  • Ultra-wide field of view for dramatic landscapes
  • Fast F/2.8 aperture for low-light situations and creative effects like bokeh
  • Weather sealed
  • Excellent image quality

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Heavy and bulky to carry around
  • No filter thread due to the bulbous front element

3. Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 GM

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Sony E
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft

Stepping into the mirrorless world is the Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 G-Master lens. Akin to Canon’s L line, the G-Master (GM) series is Sony’s high-end line, priding itself on improved features over the consumer versions. 

Sharing the same focal length versatility as others in this range, this model also has excellent weather sealing for any outdoor situation. An improved dust-resistant construction also aids in keeping the lens in tip-top condition consistently. However, this 16-35mm lens is rather large and bulky compared to other mirrorless lenses, counterintuitive to where mirrorless systems excel (being small and easier to carry). The thickness of the lens itself also requires a relatively large filter thread at 82mm. 

Some may consider the size a worthy compromise for this lens’s other benefits. The autofocus is silent, fast, and very reliable because of the direct drive supersonic wave motor, jargon for a brand new mirrorless-exclusive autofocus system that allows the photographer to relax and shoot. Even if you are predominantly a landscape photographer, the occasional deer in your landscape scene can quickly be captured with precision! 

The image quality produced by this lens is superb in and of itself, with sharpness, contrast, and color fidelity across the frame. It also has minimal distortion, chromatic aberration, vignetting, and flare. 

All of this does come at a cost. However, a luxury lens like this equates to a hefty price tag. However, the lens is built to last, so the initial investment is long-term. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Fast F/2.8 aperture for low light situations and bokeh
  • Weather-sealed and dust-resistant construction
  • Quick and quiet autofocus performance
  • Outstanding image quality with sharpness

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Very expensive compared to other wide angle zoom lenses
  • Heavy to carry around

4. Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Various (Sony, Leica, Canon, Nikon)
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.26m / 0.85ft

Brand name lenses aren’t the only ones to value; third-party companies also produce some worthy-of-investment glass. The Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art is a big contender in the wide angle field, coming in at a lower cost than Canon’s L series or Sony’s GM series lenses while still proving to output professional quality. 

SIGMA’s Art line uses state-of-the-art glass to produce images rich in color, sharp and clear in focus, and with good tonal contrast. The glass coating helps mitigate chromatic aberration, reduces light leaks and flares, and keeps the edges from vignetting. This ensures that landscape photographs are clear and crisp from edge to edge. This lens has some distortion around the edges, but it isn’t super noticeable from my experience.

Although the lens is rather bulky and oversized compared to other wide angle lens options, the durable construction makes this a small price to pay. Made of solid material, the Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art can withstand roughness by the photographer and the forces of nature itself. 

The lens is still pricey as the Art line is SIGMA’s high-end option, but a few hundred dollar difference from the name-brand lenses will save you a decent amount of money. Plus, this model comes in various camera mounts – and the mount can be converted should you decide to switch brands. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Ultra-wide field of view for dramatic landscapes
  • Fast F/2.8 aperture for low light situations and bokeh
  • Superior optical design and quality with a weather-sealed and dust-proof construction
  • Smooth and quiet autofocus performance with stepping motor

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Quite Heavy and bulky
  • It has slight distortion around the edges of the frame at its widest focal length

5. Canon RF 15-35mm F/2.8L IS USM

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon RF
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft

Canon’s step into the mirrorless realm resulted in significant advancements in lens technology, including unique focal lengths that weren’t seen before.

The Canon RF 15-35mm F/2.8L IS USM is an overall improvement upon the brand’s classic Canon EF 16-35mm, sporting the same image stabilization system, and motor – but adding one millimeter in focal length. Although one millimeter does not seem like it would make a big difference, plenty of landscape photographers would argue that it does! 

Alongside the expected weather sealing and dust resistance that this price point offers, the actual body of the lens has a few extra features on it as well. A new control ring and lock switch is available, helping secure focus points and offering better control than in older lens models. This control ring can be programmed to aid with autofocus, exposure, image settings, and more if you’re shooting with one of Canon’s mirrorless camera bodies.

Image stabilization, quiet and accurate autofocus, and an even more significant step up in image quality (thanks in part to new advancements in mirrorless cameras) are additional perks to this particular lens model. 

That being said, Canon’s entire mirrorless (RF) lineup is expensive, and this lens is no exception. It is not backward compatible with DSLR cameras, so you need to be a Canon RF user to enjoy it. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Versatile focal length range for different types of landscapes
  • Fast F/2.8 aperture for low-light situations and creative effects
  • Weather-sealed and dust-resistant
  • Fast and quiet autofocus performance with nano USM motor

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Very expensive
  • RF mount exclusive

6. Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F/4 S

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Nikon Z
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft

Like the RF above, the Nikkor Z lenses are exclusive to Nikon’s mirrorless lineup. Embracing the size benefits of mirrorless models, The Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F/4 S weighs in at just under a pound, making this lens lightweight and portable without compromising quality. This lens is a fantastic option for landscape photographers looking for a compact zoom lens. 

Nikon’s exclusive technology for the autofocus motor keeps the focus whirr a thing of the past as this lens is relatively silent. Although landscapes certainly won’t run away from you at the sound of a camera, this can make the shooting experience more enjoyable. 

The 14-30mm field of view is wide enough to shoot extravagant overlooks without deciding what mountain to crop out of frame, while the 30mm is just enough of a zoom to play with composition. However, the F/4 aperture can be troublesome in lower light situations compared to the F/2.8 versions. 

In addition, the customizable control ring gives you quick adjustment over your shots and allows you to easily alter your settings without digging into the camera menu. Like the other lenses on my list, this lens delivers excellent image quality with sharpness, contrast, and color fidelity across the frame. It also has minimal distortion, chromatic aberration, vignetting, and flare, so your photos are clean and clear every time.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Ultra-wide field of view for dramatic landscapes
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Fast and quiet autofocus performance
  • Excellent image quality

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Relatively expensive
  • Not great in low light with an F/4 aperture

7. Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Various (Canon EF-S, Nikon F, Sony A, Pentax K, etc.)
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.24m / 0.79ft

Most lenses on the list are for full-frame cameras, so APS-C or crop sensor photographers don’t need to feel left out. The Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD is an ultra-wide crop sensor model that won’t hurt the wallet on price. In fact, this was the first wide-angle lens I ever purchased for my Canon Rebel camera back in the day.

Taken on the Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 lens

With a constant maximum aperture of f/3.5 throughout the zoom range, you can achieve decent low-light performance and depth of field control. And thanks to its hypersonic motor, autofocus performance is surprisingly good for the price. As a third-party lens, this model communicates natively with various camera bodies.

And while the Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM doesn’t have the sharpest edges, it still delivers excellent results. For the budding landscape photographer, this lens is worth considering. With its ultra-wide field of view, sturdy design, and decent performance, it’s sure to be an excellent addition to the kit. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Affordable price compared to other wide-angle zoom lenses
  • Very robust feeling
  • Constant F/3.5 aperture for decent low-light performance and depth of field control
  • A great starter lens for new or aspiring landscape photographers

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Not compatible with full-frame sensor cameras
  • Not as fast as some other wide-angle lenses with an F/2.8 aperture

8. Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon EF or Nikon F
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft

With all of this talk on SIGMA, one shouldn’t forget Tamron! Another third-party lens brand, the Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2, is a good option for DSLR photographers. Priced even lower than SIGMA, this lens is an excellent choice for Canon or Nikon users looking for a high-quality, professional-grade lens with an affordable price tag.

One of the key features of the Tamron wide-angle lens is its weather-resistant and moisture-proof construction, along with the fluorine coating on the front element, providing additional protection for photographers working in challenging and demanding environments. However, the size and bulk make this model a workout to carry. But hey, maybe you’ll get some toned biceps in the process.

Another standout feature of this lens is its vibration compensation system that can reduce camera shake by up to four stops, allowing photographers to capture handheld shots even in low light conditions. The F/2.8 bokeh is also worthy of note, with the aperture blades providing a very organic and soft depth of field. 

While the very convex front elements make this lens incompatible with filters (understandably a deal breaker for some), the lens still offers excellent image quality with minimal optical flaws, delivering sharpness that would make any photographer turn their head. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Fast F/2.8 aperture for low light situations and bokeh
  • Vibration compensation system for handheld shooting
  • Fast and accurate autofocus performance with ultrasonic silent drive motor

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Heavy
  • No filter thread due to the bulbous front element

9. Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F/4 R OIS WR

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Fujifilm X
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.24m / 0.79ft

As niche a brand as Fuji is, the lenses are equally niche. The crop sensor Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F/4 R OIS WR is an ultra wide angle lens with a great versatile range, going from an ultra field of view at 10mm to a beloved standard 24mm range.

Overall, this lens improves from older models, genuinely feeling like the brand listened to their users and offered better performance. This compact optic has little at fault, from more durable construction that can tackle the wear and tear of landscape photography hikes to a fast and quiet autofocus. 

One of the best things about this lens is its excellent image quality. The sharpness and clarity it produces are unrivaled, and it is designed to minimize optical flaws such as distortion and chromatic aberration.

Reasons To Buy:

  • New design and performance with improved features and functions
  • Weather-resistant and dust-proof
  • Image stabilization system for handheld shooting
  • Excellent image quality with sharpness

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Relatively expensive for a crop sensor lens
  • Not great for low-light or nighttime images

10. Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Micro Four Thirds
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.25m / 0.82ft

Panasonic Lumix photographers can happily enjoy landscape photography with the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH. 7-14mm may sound like an exquisite focal range, but this crop-sensor lens resembles 14-28mm on a full-frame camera. 

Lumix photographers can enjoy many of the same perks as Canon, Nikon, and Sony photographers – this lens produces great images with minimal optical flaws aimed at reducing chromatic aberration and flaring. This means you can rely on this lens to capture stunning, distortion-free landscape images every time. Additionally, its sleek and elegant design adds to its appeal.

The lens has a constant maximum aperture of f/4 throughout the zoom range, ensuring consistent exposure and depth of field control. However, this means it lacks the low light performance and bokeh effects of some other lenses. 

The compact and lightweight design makes the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH an excellent travel companion. The small stature is quite significant compared to most of the lenses in this focal range, as they tend to be large!  

Reasons To Buy:

  • Compact and lightweight design
  • Constant F/4 aperture
  • Good image quality with sharpness and minimal optical flaws

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Not great in low light with F/4
  • No filter thread due to the bulbous front element

11. Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm F/2.8 PRO

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Micro Four Thirds
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.2m / 0.66ft

Last but not least, by any means, Olympus has an equivalent model for their photographers as Panasonic. This high-end wide-angle zoom lens boasts an impressive ultra-wide field of view that provides the equivalent of 14-28mm on a full-frame camera.

The lens’s sturdy and weather-sealed construction, which includes a durable metal barrel and a manual focus clutch, makes it an ideal option for outdoor photography enthusiasts. The lens’s fast maximum aperture of f/2.8 throughout the zoom range offers exceptional low-light performance and impeccable bokeh, which results in impressive images. 

This model boasts outstanding sharpness, contrast, and color accuracy across the entire frame, especially for a crop-sensor lens. However, it is worth noting that the extremely wide field of view does cause some optic distortion. 

Reasons To Buy:

  • Ultra-wide field of view
  • Robust and weather-sealed construction with metal barrel
  • Fast F/2.8 aperture for excellent low-light performance and bokeh
  • Superb image quality with sharpness and minimal optical flaws

Reasons To Avoid: 

  • Expensive for a Micro Four Thirds lens
  • It has lens distortion due to its vast field of view

How To Choose A Wide Angle Lens For Landscape Photography

It’s essential to understand how to choose the right glass. With so many lenses on the market, making the decision can seem daunting. Luckily, there are a few key considerations to look into that can help narrow the list down.

Focal Length

The focal length of a lens determines two crucial aspects of a photograph: the angle of view and the magnification. The angle of view is the amount of the scene captured in the picture, and the magnification is the size of the objects relative to their actual size.

For landscape photography, a wider field of view serves the photographer better than something narrower. Most landscapes are vast and include a background, middle ground, and foreground – a wide angle lens can capture all three in one frame. Ideally, landscape photographers prefer lenses with focal lengths of 14mm to 35mm. 

That said, the wider the lens, the more optic distortion the lens likely has. Optic distortion refers to a fishbowl effect in which subjects close to the center of the frame appear wider than those on the edges. This is because the glass must be curved to have such a wide field of view. Lenses with less distortion are favored over those with more but tend to be more expensive. 

Prime Versus Zoom Lenses

There are two types of lenses: prime and zoom lenses. Prime lenses have a fixed focal length and cannot zoom in or out, while zoom lenses have a variable focal length. Prime lenses are generally smaller, lighter, and faster than zoom lenses, but zoom lenses offer more flexibility and convenience.

Once upon a time, prime lenses were regarded as sharper than zoom ones. Both are of equal quality in sharpness, clarity, and tonal range. However, Zoom lenses still tend to be slower than primes as their widest aperture is F/2.8, versus prime lenses that can go all the way to the width F/1.2! However, this doesn’t factor heavily for landscape photographers, as most apertures are adjusted to F/12 or more. 

The versatility of a zoom lens for landscape photography makes this the ideal choice for this photography niche over a fixed focal length. 

Crop Factor

Not all cameras are the same: some sport full frame sensors and others utilize APS-C or crop sensors. This changes the lens’s focal length if a full-frame lens is placed on a crop sensor body (crop sensor lenses cannot be used on full-frame bodies). 

A lens with a focal length of 50mm on a camera with a crop factor of 1.5x will have an effective focal length of 75mm. Therefore, it’s essential to consider what size camera sensor you have and the crop factor when choosing a lens for your camera.

Aperture

The aperture is the opening in a camera lens that controls the amount of light that enters the camera. A larger aperture lets more light enter the camera, producing brighter exposure. In comparison, a smaller aperture allows less light to enter the camera, resulting in a darker exposure.

A larger aperture will result in a shallower depth of field, meaning that only a small part of the image will be in focus while the rest will be blurred. A smaller aperture will result in a greater depth of field, meaning that more of the image will be in focus.

Aperture is less important for landscape photography because most landscape photographers use smaller apertures like F/11 to achieve maximum sharpness and depth of field. This is because landscape photography typically requires a larger depth of field to capture the entire scene in focus. However, there are situations where a larger aperture can be useful, such as low light conditions, creative effects, or isolating a subject.

For example, an aperture of f/1.8 will make the subject stand out from the background with a creamy bokeh effect. An aperture of f/16 will keep almost the entire image in focus.

Image Quality & Lens Distortion

The image quality of a lens is affected by several factors, such as sharpness, contrast, color rendition, chromatic aberration, vignetting, and flare. Sharpness refers to the clarity and detail of the image, while contrast refers to the difference between light and dark areas. 

Color rendition refers to the accuracy of colors, and chromatic aberration refers to the color fringing that can occur in high-contrast areas. Vignetting refers to the darkening around the edges of the image, while flare refers to the unwanted light that can enter the lens and degrade the image.

In landscape photography, these factors can impact the quality and appearance of the photos. For example, a lens with high sharpness and contrast can produce more detailed and defined images, while a lens with poor color rendition can produce inaccurate and dull colors. 

Distortion refers to altering the shape and proportions of objects in a photo. In landscape photography, distortion can affect the appearance of natural features such as mountains, trees, and buildings. 

Distortion can negatively or positively affect landscape photos depending on the intended effect. For example, distortion can make distant mountains appear even farther away, creating a sense of depth and scale. However, excessive distortion can make the image appear unnatural.

Lens & Filter Compatibility

When considering a lens, it is vital to check its compatibility with your camera system. Some factors that affect compatibility include camera mount and filter thread size. For example, an RF Canon lens will not work on an EF Canon mount because they have different mounts. Similarly, a lens with a filter thread size of 67mm will not be compatible with a camera with a filter thread size of 55mm.

Equally, some wide angle lenses have too much of a concave in the glass to allow filters to be used. This could be a big make-or-break situation for photographers relying on their filters to capture the intended photos.

Which Wide Angle Lens Should You Buy For Your Landscape Photos?

Are you still trying to decide? If you aren’t committed to a name brand and can start from scratch, these are my top five picks: 

ImageProductFeaturesPrice
Best Overall
Canon EF 16-35mm F/4L IS USM

Canon EF 16-35mm F/4L IS USM

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon EF
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Best For Nikon
Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm F/2.8G ED

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm F/2.8G ED

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Nikon F
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.27m / 0.9ft
Find On Amazon
Best For Sony
Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 GM

Sony FE 16-35mm F/2.8 GM

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Sony E
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art

Sigma 14-24mm F/2.8 DG DN Art

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Various (Sony, Leica, Canon, Nikon)
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.26m / 0.85ft
Find On Amazon
Best For Canon
Canon RF 15-35mm F/2.8L IS USM

Canon RF 15-35mm F/2.8L IS USM

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon RF
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F/4 S

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F/4 S

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Nikon Z
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Best Budget Option
Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD

Sigma 10-20mm F/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Various (Canon EF-S, Nikon F, Sony A, Pentax K, etc.)
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.24m / 0.79ft
Find On Amazon
Best Third Party Choice
Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Canon EF or Nikon F
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.28m / 0.92ft
Find On Amazon
Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F/4 R OIS WR

Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F/4 R OIS WR

  • Stabilization: Yes
  • Mount type: Fujifilm X
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.24m / 0.79ft
Find On Amazon
Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH

Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F/4 ASPH

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Micro Four Thirds
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.25m / 0.82ft
Find On Amazon
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm F/2.8 PRO

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm F/2.8 PRO

  • Stabilization: No
  • Mount type: Micro Four Thirds
  • Minimum focus distance: 0.2m / 0.66ft
Find On Amazon
We review products based on independent experience and research, but we may earn affiliate commissions from buying links on this page.


Photo of author
I'm a Canadian photographer and photo retoucher turned founder of bwillcreative.com. Around here I help you to decode the mystery of photo editing with no-fluff videos and written guides to help you achieve your creative goals. Outside of shooting photos and my passion for educating, you'll find me mountain biking or on the trails with my dog, Sunny!

Continue Reading:

How To Create Adjustment Presets In Photoshop

Learn how to create adjustment presets in Photoshop in a few easy steps to speed up your work and create consistent edits across multiple images

How To Use The Marquee Tool In Photoshop

Learn how to use the Marquee Tool in Photoshop to crop layers, create basic selections, add selective adjustments, and more with ease.

How To Crop A Layer In Photoshop (3 Simple Methods)

If you're struggling to figure out how to crop a layer in Photoshop, you're not alone. Fortunately, there are a few easy (not so obvious) methods to help you crop a single layer in Photoshop.

How To Use Generative Remove In Lightroom – Complete Guide

Learn how to use the Generative Remove feature in Adobe Lightroom to seamlessly remove large objects from your photos with AI.

What Are Embedded Previews In Lightroom + How To Use Them

Use this guide to help you understand the use of embedded previews in Lightroom along with tips to help you use them in your workflow.

Adobe Lightroom System Requirements For Mac & PC

Here's a breakdown of the system requirements for Adobe Lightroom Classic and Lightroom CC to make sure it will run smoothly on your computer.

How To Outline An Image In Canva

Learn how to outline anything in Canva from outlining images, shapes, text, designs, and more with a few easy steps.

How To Add A Border In Canva (To Images, Shapes & Text!)

Learn how to easily add a border to your designs, images, shapes, and text in Canva using these step by step techniques.

How To Make A Background Transparent In Canva

Learn how to create and export images with transparent backgrounds in Canva to open up more design options and creative styles.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments