Finding a camera that doesn’t destroy your savings account is like finding a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. It’s something we all want, but unfortunately, they’re pretty hard to find. So I set out to make this a bit easier by compiling a list of the absolute best affordable cameras under $1000.

In this price range, you can find plenty of professional feeling cameras capable of impressing any enthusiast or serving as a second body for professional shooters.

To create this list, I leaned into as much of my first-hand experience as I could for the cameras I have used over my photography career. For the cameras I lack experience with, I reached out to other photographers and heavily researched over two dozen cameras in this price range to find the best options.

What we’re left with are the best few based on their overall photo and video capabilities, ease of use, image quality, autofocus abilities, and more. If you’re in a rush, here are the top three picks at a glance:

Best Overall
Sony a6400
Canon EOS M50 Mark II
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV
Product Title
Product Title
Sony a6400
Canon EOS M50 Mark II
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV
Camera Type
Camera Type
Mirrorless
Mirrorless
Mirrorless
Sensor Size
Sensor Size
APS-C
APS-C
Micro Four Thirds
Image Resolution
Image Resolution
24.2MP
24.1MP
20MP
Video Resolution
Video Resolution
Up to 4K 30p
Up to 4K 24p
Up to 4K 30p
Burst Photo
Burst Photo
11 FPS
10 FPS
5 FPS
Face & Eye Tracking
Face & Eye Tracking
YES
YES
YES
Wifi & Bluetooth
Wifi & Bluetooth
YES
YES
YES
Best For
Best For
Enthusiasts & Advanced Shooters
Beginners or Content Creators
Beginners & Enthusiasts
This website may make a commission on purchases made through links on this page at no extra cost to you. These commissions help to run the website and keep all the content free.

But let’s dive into these cameras and more to help find the perfect one that’s in your price range.

The Best Cameras Under $1000 (DSLR & Mirrorless)

1. Sony a6400 (Best Overall)

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 24.2MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 30p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 11FPS (8FPS Silent Shooting)
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Enthusiasts or as a second body for advanced shooters

The Sony a6400 is the best all-around option for those wanting great photo and video capabilities from a camera that’s easy to pack around and has plenty of lens options. As a mirrorless camera, the body is significantly smaller than a DSLR and tends to have better autofocus capabilities.

This camera captures fantastic quality stills with a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor. Although crop sensors don’t perform as well as a full frame in low light situations, the wide ISO range of ISO 100-32000 solves this problem to a point. As an added plus, Sony cameras tend to have an incredible amount of dynamic range. That means you can easily recover dark shadows or bright highlights when post-processing your raws taken with the a6400.

In terms of video, this camera can shoot up to 4K at 30 frames per second and includes a microphone input if recording vlogs or interviews. For novice video production or creating youtube and social media content, this covers all your needs.

One of my favorite features of this camera is the autofocus. The 425-point phase-detection AF system is by far the most impressive of any camera in this list, making it easy to shoot tack-sharp action shots. It even includes eye tracking to keep subjects in focus at all times without much worry. Although eye detection is a pretty standard feature across all cameras in this list.

The battery life is decent, with an average of 410 images per charge. Unfortunately, that shorter battery life is a common issue with all mirrorless cameras since the electronic viewfinder and shutter take up a bit more juice.

The only downsides to this camera is that it feels quite small in hand and the menu systems are confusing to learn. For absolute beginners, this camera might feel a bit overwhelming but will prove extremely enjoyable for any enthusiast wanting to expand their photo and video skills.

Reasons To Buy:

  • One of the best autofocusing systems you will find
  • Tilting screen makes it easy to view at any angle
  • Good continuous shooting for action shots
  • High-quality 4K video capture
  • Weather sealed

Reasons To Avoid:

  • No in-body image stabilization
  • Has a confusing menu layout to learn
  • No headphone output for video

2. Canon EOS M50 Mark II (Best For Content Creators)

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 24.1MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 24p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 10FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginners or Content Creators

The M50 is an ideal camera for beginners and enthusiasts who need high-quality images and video without a steep learning curve. However, this camera is better suited for those looking to create social media content and youtube videos than a camera that you can test your photography skills with.

With a 24.1 megapixel APS-C sensor, this camera shoots great quality images with a basic autofocusing system that shines with its eye-tracking AF. Where this camera primarily excels is in the video department for social media use. It can capture up to 4K at 24 frames per second (cropped at 1.55x) and includes HDMI outputs to use as a streaming webcam. It’s also one of the few cameras on the market that you can wirelessly live stream to youtube with if you have over 1,000 subscribers.

The 3” touchscreen is fully articulating, making it easy to capture shots at any angle. It gets the job done for enthusiasts wanting to capture action shots with up to 10FPS bursts with autofocus enabled. It does well with movement that stays within the frame but struggles to track focus when a subject quickly moves in and out of the frame.

What I like most about this camera is the amazing in-hand feel. It has a deep grip that feels secure to hold, and the button layout is easy to navigate and use. Surprisingly it still feels relatively compact, considering its chunkier feel. 

Overall, this camera is fantastic for anyone needing high-quality photos or video to share online. Since it’s quite easy to learn and use, you can quite literally pick up this camera and start shooting with its impressively good auto-modes. 

With that said, this camera will feel a bit limiting if you want to challenge your photography. Especially in more demanding settings like shooting weddings, sports, or wildlife, you’ll be left frustrated by this camera’s performance.

If you are buying your first camera, shooting portraits, casual family events, product images, or streaming, this is one of the best beginner-friendly cameras you can find.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Captures high-quality photo and video without a steep learning curve
  • Fantastic for live streaming & webcam use
  • Performs well in low-light situations
  • Good battery life
  • Extremely good eye detection autofocus

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Heavily crops 4K video with 1.55x crop
  • Bad autofocus when shooting 4K video

3. Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: Micro Four Thirds
  • Image Resolution: 20MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 30p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 5FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginners & Enthusiasts

This serves as the entry-level model for the Olympus lineup that has some impressive video capabilities and autofocus abilities, considering the price. At 20MP, it’s slightly less resolution than other cameras on this list, but the actual image quality difference is almost unnoticeable when viewing. It still captures extremely sharp images and high-quality 4K video that’s made even better with this camera’s in-body image stabilization.

The autofocus abilities of this camera are relatively good for both stills and video with contrast-detection autofocusing. It does a fine job of nailing focus in well-lit scenes or of people but struggles more in the low light.

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 is enjoyable to shoot fully manual with but functions well in full-auto, too, with several built-in filters to further enhance your images. This can help give your photos a post-processed feel without needing actually to edit anything. From color enhancers to skin softening filters, there are a surprising amount of options built in. Although not all look very good, if I’m being honest.

This camera is not the greatest if you are serious about video, since it does not include a microphone or headphone port. Although you could get away with shooting B-roll or other clips where you don’t need perfect audio. Its autofocus tracking is good even when recording video, and its small size makes it ideal for taking around with you while out and about.

Overall, this camera is a great option if you’re looking to upgrade from your phone camera and start getting serious about photography. It’s perfectly suited as a packable travel camera or to capture moments with friends and family. However, if you are shooting action or wildlife, you’ll be let down by the autofocusing this camera offers and the lack of burst rate.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Super compact but still has interchangeable lenses
  • Flip up screen to easily view from all angles
  • 5-Axis in-body stabilization
  • Fast and responsive autofocus with face and eye detection
  • Super stylish

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Doesn’t perform well in low light
  • Lacks external mic or headphone ports for video recording
  • Doesn’t have a good burst photo speed

4. Canon Rebel T8i (Best Entry-Level DSLR)

  • Camera Type: DSLR
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 24MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 24p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 7 FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginners & Enthusiasts

The Canon T8i favors photography more than video but still does a good enough job all around so you can test your skills in either field. The 24-megapixel APS-C sensor captures great quality stills but can tend to struggle in low-light conditions. Although there is an ISO range of ISO 100-25600, the camera’s image quality drastically degrades at higher ISOs.

With that said, any regular lighting conditions make this camera a pleasure to shoot with. The autofocusing system is simple but does the job with 45-point phase-detect autofocus. It has face and eye-tracking autofocus settings, too, which work exceptionally well for photographing people and pets. The only complaint I’ve had with the autofocusing points is that they are centrally clustered, making it difficult to set the AF point around the edges of the frame. For some shots, this can feel a bit limiting, but 90% of the time, it’s not a huge deal.

The video capabilities are decent, with up to 4K at 24 frames per second. However, the 4K video is severely cropped at 1.6x, which can be frustrating depending on the lenses you have. Even with the standard 18-55mm that comes with the camera, you might find yourself wishing you could go wider if video is your main focus. The 1080p video is uncropped and looks alright, but might be a bit soft looking for some people’s tastes.

Going back to photos, the optical viewfinder is something you might prefer over an electronic viewfinder found in mirrorless bodies. With the optical viewfinder in the Rebel T8i, you get a better view of your scene regardless of the lighting conditions. Especially when shooting bursts, there is no lag, and it’s much easier to track your subjects accurately.

Unfortunately, the burst speed of this camera isn’t the greatest with a 7 FPS continuous shutter, but if you aren’t regularly shooting wildlife or sports, this shouldn’t be a deal breaker.

Ultimately this camera is one of the best entry-level DSLR cameras you can buy and offers room to grow for beginner photographers. An earlier model of the rebel series was one of my first cameras before I started shooting professionally, and it served as a great stepping stone.

If you want a capable photo camera that you can still experiment with video with, this is a great option. However, if you are primarily interested in video, I would suggest something else.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Has good face and eye tracking autofocus
  • Lag-free viewfinder since its a DSLR
  • Easy to learn with a simple menu layout
  • Is compatible with higher-quality L-series lenses from Canon

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Heavily cropped 4k video at 1.6x crop
  • Mediocre burst speeds at 7 frames per second
  • No in-body stabilization

5. Fujifilm X-S10 (Best For Creative Filmmaking)

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 26MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 30p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 30 FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginners & Advanced Enthusiasts Alike

The Fujifilm X-S10 boasts an impressive 26-megapixel APS-C sensor that captures incredibly sharp photos and video. Its in-body stabilization makes it a pleasure to shoot with and makes your handheld videos look a whole lot more professional.

The autofocusing of this camera isn’t too bad but doesn’t work well for locking onto animals or people moving quickly through the frame. The face and eye tracking isn’t as good as other cameras mentioned so far but gets the job done for any hobby photographer. If you can get away with single-point AF, the 30 FPS burst photos can capture some seriously awesome action shots. The movement just has to be a little more predictable without the luxury of reactive subject tracking.

As for the video, this camera can capture 4K at up to 30 frames per second, along with F-LOG support to give you more options while color grading. With an external microphone and headphone ports, this is a fully capable video camera for creative filmmaking or content creation. Although it cannot be used like the Canon M50 for streaming.

The touchscreen display is fully articulating, making it easy to find unique angles with this camera. However, if you’re looking through the viewfinder instead, the OLED display is impressively sharp and is one of the better EVFs available in mirrorless cameras under $1000.

You should consider this camera if you want to capture high-quality photos and video with an extremely compact camera. Whether it be working on creative projects or practicing your shooting skills, this camera offers plenty of room to grow.

Reasons To Buy:

  • F-LOG support for better video color grading
  • Fully articulating touchscreen to shoot from all angles easily
  • Extremely compact & easy to travel with
  • Fantastic burst photo capture for action shots
  • Has in-body stabilization

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Lacks advanced subject tracking
  • The viewfinder is small to look through

6. Nikon Z50

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 20.9MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 30p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 11 FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Content Creators & Enthusiasts

The Nikon Z50 is another great option for those focused on vlog-style videos and capturing photos for social media. With a 20.9-megapixel APS-C sensor and phase detection autofocusing, the camera makes it easy to capture high-quality stills and video, with optional slow-motion features perfect for capturing action video.

The 3.2” swivel and flip-down touch screen is really nice to shoot with since you can clearly see your frame from any angle. Even when facing the camera towards yourself, you can easily preview your shot, and it tracks focus well with eye detection AF.

For capturing action photos, it has a decent burst rate of 11 fps, and the 209-point autofocus system tracks subjects well as they move throughout the frame.

When shooting video, the Z50 can capture up to 4K at 30 frames per second totally uncropped. This is a huge advantage over most of the other cameras mentioned here, which have 1.4x cropping or more when shooting in 4K. To sweeten the deal when shooting video on this camera, you can also capture 120 frames per second slow motion video at 1080p. This is a ton of fun to play around with, especially with action sports and wildlife videos.

In terms of battery, this camera is pretty average, with around 300 shots per charge. It’s more than enough for a couple of hours of shooting, but not ideal if you are going long periods without being able to charge the camera. Say while traveling remotely, for example.

Overall, if you want a wide range of lens options and extremely reliable autofocus for photo and video, you might be let down by this camera. However, this is a fantastic alternative to the Canon M50 if you want higher-quality video and don’t need wireless streaming or webcam options. It also serves as an easy-to-use camera for beginners and enthusiasts just wanting to capture super high-quality stills and video.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Great autofocus with eye tracking
  • Large swivel display for easy shooting at any angle
  • High burst photo rate at 11fps
  • Can capture slow-motion video at 120p

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Could have more AF points for subject tracking through all areas of the frame
  • Doesn’t have a stellar battery life

7. Canon EOS RP (Best Entry-Level Full Frame)

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: Full Frame
  • Image Resolution: 26MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K at 24p, cropped 1.7x
  • Burst Photo Speed: 5FPS with MF, 4FPS with AF
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginner & Novice Photographers

A stand-out feature of the RP is that it has a 26-megapixel full-frame sensor making it perform better in low light, and opens up your options with lens possibilities. For any hobby photographer wanting a capable camera on a budget, this is a fantastic option. For more advanced or professional shooters, this proves as a cost-effective option as a second body or backup camera.

Overall this camera is primarily suited for those who love capturing photos more than videos. It has fantastic autofocusing with stellar face and eye tracking that locks onto subjects and pets surprisingly well. The fully articulating screen makes it easy to shoot photos at any angle, and the OLED EVF is a pleasure to shoot through. 

Unfortunately, this camera is limited when shooting bursts, as it only captures five frames per second with manual focus or four frames per second with autofocus enabled.

For video, this camera drops the ball with recording capabilities up to 4K 24p, but crops in 1.7x, and autofocus is disabled when shooting in 4K. If you just need basic FHD video, this camera will get you by. However, it’s a bad option if ultra-HD video is a must-have.

As far as full frames go, this is one of the slimmest and lowest-profile ones you can get. It’s great for packing around and doesn’t take up much weight or space when hiking or traveling. It’s also compatible with Canon’s lineup of RF lenses, which are typically faster and more compact than their L-series equivalents. 

The Canon EOS RP is a good option for those wanting a fantastic photo experience from a budget camera but don’t need top-tier video capabilities.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Full frame sensor performs better in low light and at high ISO
  • Extremely low profile for a mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses
  • Great autofocus & subject tracking
  • One of the cheapest full frames you can find

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Heavily cropped 4K video recording
  • Mediocre burst capture at just five frames per second

8. Nikon D7500

  • Camera Type: DSLR
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 20.9MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 30p, uncropped
  • Burst Photo Speed: 8FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginner & Novice

The D7500 can be seen as the DSLR equivalent to the Nikon Z50, but with a longer battery life, faster max shutter at 1/8000, and a better in-hand feel. With a 20.9-megapixel APS-C sensor, this camera captures high-quality stills with a lag-free viewfinder since it doesn’t have an EVF like mirrorless cameras.

The autofocus gets the job done but is nothing to write home about. With 51-point phase detection autofocus and 15-point cross-type autofocus in live view, it’s easy to keep your subject’s tack sharp. However, this camera lacks eye or face tracking, making it a bit more difficult to track subjects through the frame, especially when their movements aren’t predictable, like with sports photography. With a burst rate of only 8 frames per second, this camera isn’t a superstar for action photography anyways.

For video, the D7500 can capture 4K 30p uncropped or FHD 1080p at 60p, making it a decent option for hobby photographers and videographers alike. 

Overall this camera feels more enjoyable to shoot photos with over a long day with a better in-hand feel compared to the Nikon Z50. It’s noticeably bulkier than the Nikon Z50, but it’s a trade-off for almost 4x better battery life and a faster max shutter speed for capturing fast-moving action.

This camera is perfect for any beginner or enthusiast photographer wanting the best of both worlds in photo and video, with a camera that feels and looks like a $2000+ camera.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Incredible battery life
  • Feels like a $2000+ professional camera
  • Lag-free shooting through the viewfinder since its a DSLR
  • Faster max shutter speed compared to its mirrorless equivalent

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Bulkier & heavier than a mirrorless camera
  • Lacks advanced autofocus features like face or eye tracking

9. Fujifilm X-T200

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: APS-C
  • Image Resolution: 24MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4k 30p, 120p slow-mo at 1080p
  • Burst Photo Speed: 8FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Beginners & Enthusiasts

The Fujifilm X-T200 is a photo-focused camera capturing superb quality images with its 24-megapixel APS-C sensor and impressive hybrid autofocusing system. This camera has a 425-point phase detect autofocus system that locks onto subjects easily from any part of your frame and uses face and eye detection to focus on people with ease.

Unfortunately, this camera only shines for photos, as its video capabilities are severely limited. With oversampled 4K video, it doesn’t offer the sharpest video, and its autofocus doesn’t shine when recording either. If you’re trying to get serious about video you’ll feel severely limited by this camera. However, most enthusiasts won’t have many issues with how this camera records video.

Besides the tech specs, this camera has a very mechanical feel with ample buttons and dials to make the shooting experience very enjoyable. Even if you don’t care much for that, this camera has the largest LCD on this list at 3.5,” and it’s fully articulating too. The colors from this camera are also fantastic, with nice-looking skin tones and highlights in every photo you capture.

Ultimately this camera is ideal for absolute beginners or if you want to upgrade from taking photos on your smartphone. Its intuitive layout and menu system make it easy to use and learn without feeling overwhelmed.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Intuitive button layout and menus
  • Great auto-focus capabilities & subject tracking
  • Very large 3.5″ articulating display
  • Captures fantastic colors & skin tones

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Mediocre video performance
  • Video looks low-quality

10. Canon G7X Mark III (Best Compact Camera)

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor Size: 1″-Type Sensor
  • Image Resolution: 20MP
  • Video Resolution: Up to 4K 30p, uncropped
  • Burst Photo Speed: 8FPS
  • Wifi & Bluetooth: YES
  • Best For: Enthusiasts & Smartphone Upgraders

The G7X is a powerhouse of a compact camera that I’ve always been blown away by. With a 20-megapixel 1”-type sensor and a built-in 24-100mm F/1.8-2.8 lens, it’s a no-fuss grab-and-go camera for capturing snapshots with ease.

It can also capture high-quality video at up to 4K 30p without cropping. When you want even more creative clips, it has 120p slow-motion video capabilities while recording at 1080p. It also includes a microphone port if you want to upgrade your audio, use this camera for youtube videos, or even as a streaming device on your computer.

The touchscreen display tilts up by 180° or down by 90° so you can capture down low angles or even take selfies quite easily. Unfortunately, when recording video, the autofocus can still hunt a little bit, even when the camera is facing directly at you. Fortunately, if you aren’t in a huge rush, it ends up catching focus after a couple of seconds when recording video.

Overall this is by far the best compact camera you can find for under $1000 and is a great option if you just want to capture special moments with family and friends. Since it offers more advanced features and a fast built-in lens, you can still capture professional-grade images with it too.

Reasons To Buy:

  • Extremely easy to learn & use
  • Great for taking traveling
  • Built-in lens means less gear to carry with you
  • Can be used as a streaming camera
  • Angled screen making it easy to shoot at all angles

Reasons To Avoid:

  • Lacks professional camera features for anyone looking to expand past hobby photography
  • Doesn’t have the best autofocus abilities

Things To Consider Before Buying A Camera Under $1000

– Full Frame VS Crop VS Micro Four Thirds Sensors

The first thing to consider when looking at a new camera is the sensor size. In a nutshell, the sensor size dictates the camera’s low light performance, along with affecting its perspective across equivalent focal lengths due to crop factor.

For example, full frame sensors are the largest sensor of the three and perform best in low light. They also do not have any crop factor, which means a 16mm lens truly looks like 16mm when shooting on a full frame. Most advanced and professional photographers opt for full-frame bodies, but they are difficult to find in cameras under $1000. The exception to that is the Canon EOS RP which is a full frame that won’t break the bank.

Crop sensors, also known as APS-C sensors, are physically smaller than a full frame sensor causing their performance to suffer in low light and have more noticeable grain at higher ISO ranges. They also affect the focal lengths of your lenses, particularly with wide-angle perspectives. For example, since an APS-C sensor has a 1.5x crop factor, that means a 16mm lens on a full frame would appear as a 24mm lens with an APS-C sensor.

Although a disadvantage with wide angles, it proves useful when zooming in since your images appear more zoomed at equivalent focal lengths, making APS-C sensors a popular choice among wildlife and sports photographers.

As for micro four third sensors, these are even smaller than APS-C sensors with a larger crop factor of 2x. This means a 16mm lens on a full frame would appear as a 32mm with a micro four-thirds sensor.

This crop factor calculator does a great job of helping visualize crop factors across different sensors and focal lengths.

– Resolution

The resolution or megapixel amount is primarily useful in determining how large you can print your images, but it hardly affects the look of a photo on a screen. Generally, anything 20MP and higher will be more than enough for any beginner, hobbyist, or novice photographer. 20MP+ will allow you to print to many standard print sizes while retaining a high-quality image.

If the image quality is your biggest concern, choosing a camera with a larger sensor will make the biggest difference in overall quality. However, better-quality lenses will also make a drastic difference in the sharpness of your images.

Just don’t think paying more for a camera with more megapixels will give you a better-quality image. It’s simply not true. Save the money and invest in better quality lenses instead.

– Mirrorless VS DSLR

The difference between these two types of cameras is somewhat complex, but let’s make it easy. The difference between a mirrorless and a DSLR is the viewfinder, shutter, and size.

On a DSLR, when you look through the viewfinder, you are seeing a reflection from several mirrors within your camera body to show what your lens sees. This offers a live preview of exactly what your camera sees, without lag, and looks true to how it appears with your eye. When shooting action, this is especially useful since there is no lag between your viewfinder and the movement of your subject.

On a mirrorless camera, they have an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), which is like a mini display within the viewfinder. This will show you a view of your scene with your camera settings applied. EVFs are useful when you want to see a live preview of your exposure as you shoot, but can have a slight delay between what you see and real life.

In terms of the shutter, DSLR cameras have a physical shutter that opens and closes. They tend to have a higher max shutter speed compared to a mirrorless camera too. Mirrorless cameras have a simulated shutter which gives them the advantage of “silently shooting.” This means you can take photos without hearing that “click” every time you press the capture button.

Finally, mirrorless cameras are much more compact than a DSLR camera since it doesn’t need to house as many mechanical components. This makes them ideal for traveling or putting into small bags. However, DSLR cameras tend to have a more meaty and robust feel that feels more natural to shoot with.

Mirrorless left, DSLR right

Overall, both mirrorless and DSLR cameras are fantastic, but it comes down to personal preference for what you’d rather buy.

– Camera Brand

The reason it’s important to consider the camera brand you buy is because of your native lens options. For example, if you have a Canon camera and are using Canon lenses, you will get the best autofocus and overall performance from the camera compared to a non-Canon lens.

Nikon, Canon, and Sony have a wide array of lens options and support that make them the best overall options to get started with. In most cases, you will continue to use your lenses throughout other camera bodies in the future, so it’s good to pick a brand to stick with for both your body and lenses.

Still Struggling To Decide? Here Are Our Top 5 Picks:

Best Overall
Sony a6400
Canon EOS M50 Mark II
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV
Canon Rebel T8i
Canon Rebel T8i
Product Title
Product Title
Sony a6400
Canon EOS M50 Mark II
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV
Canon Rebel T8i
Canon Rebel T8i
Camera Type
Camera Type
Mirrorless
Mirrorless
Mirrorless
DSLR
Mirrorless
Sensor Size
Sensor Size
APS-C
APS-C
Micro Four Thirds
APS-C
APS-C
Image Resolution
Image Resolution
24.2MP
24.1MP
20MP
24MP
26MP
Video Resolution
Video Resolution
Up to 4K 30p
Up to 4K 24p
Up to 4K 30p
Up to 4K 24p
Up to 4K 30p
Burst Photo
Burst Photo
11 FPS
10 FPS
5 FPS
7 FPS
30 FPS
Face & Eye Tracking
Face & Eye Tracking
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Wifi & Bluetooth
Wifi & Bluetooth
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Best For
Best For
Enthusiasts & Advanced Shooters
Beginners or Content Creators
Beginners & Enthusiasts
Beginners & Enthusiasts
Beginners & Advanced Alike
This website may make a commission on purchases made through links on this page at no extra cost to you. These commissions help to run the website and keep all the content free.